Bryce campaign: Addresses human cost of being left behind in new video

Contact: Julia Savel, 973-525-5579, juliasavel@randybryceforcongress.com

RACINE, WI – Today, the Randy Bryce for Congress campaign released a video entitled “Eric,” that shows the human cost of being left behind by elected leaders in Washington.

“It’s become far too easy to ignore or dehumanize people who are suffering through difficult times. Whether it’s being uninsured or underinsured, having multiple jobs and still not being able to make ends meet, the rise of the opioid epidemic or so many other challenges, those who are supposed to be representing us in Washington have turned their backs on working people in Wisconsin and across the country,” said Randy Bryce. “Lee was a father, a husband, a union member, a man who cared about his community, and he was forgotten by the same Washington insiders who have put party first. I’m not going to let anyone forget about Lee or his family. I got into this race because we need more working people in Congress. And I’m going to fight in memory of Lee as well as for the millions of Americans who have been left behind. Divisiveness and partisanship in Washington have kept us from solving real life and death problems–enough is enough. This isn’t an issue of party; this is about humanity. And it’s time we put people and families first.”

VIDEO SCRIPT

[Home Video]

“Dad what’s my name?”

[mumble]

“Because I want to know my name”

[mumble]

“Me! Whats my name!”

“Ralph?”

“No that’s your dad’s name.”

“Ok, what’s your name?”

“Lee– Lee Schulz”

“What’s my name?”

“Eric Paul, why?”

“Do you remember my name?”

“Yea why?”

My dad’s name was Lee Schulz. He passed away August 5, 2017. That same year, our house burnt down. He got addicted to opioids. He was my best friend. When my dad was clean, he was really funny, smart. He was my role model.

They said he’s overdosed. I just remember, having to tell my kids. How do you tell your kids that? You know? I had Eric and my oldest son Shane were both living here, so I had to go downstairs and tell them. How do you do that?

I am 18 years old, just turned 18. I live in New Berlin, Wisconsin. Next year I am going to Winona State University in Minnesota. I live with my mom. I am always at my happiest when I am with my family. We kind of all need eachother. My dad wasn’t just an addict. He’s not just a statistic. He was a normal person. He was as real as you can get. Politicians in the pockets of pharamcutical companies, they dont know the first thing about addictions. It should be more important then it is. I’m excited to start my adult life because this is the chance I have to finally make a change.

My plan is to go to college, and I want to master politics and I want to speak for the people that I grew up with. I want to carry my dad’s legacy in telling politicians that these people, all they need is a little help. People like my dad.

My dad believed that everyone can be their greatest, and something as simple as opioids ruined his life. We need a voice. Normal people, we need to be heard. There’s so many people like me. People like my family, my friends. Most politicians can’t empathize for those people, and we need more politicians who can. Now more then ever, we need hope in a country that feels like its falling apart. You know, we can still save it and bring us back together.

Before Eric’s Father Lee passed he had plans to join Randy Bryce’s campaign for Congress.

We dedicate this campaign to Lee Russell Schulz, and we fight on in his memory.

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