Evers campaign: Releases letter he’d send first day in office: Withdrawing Wisconsin from lawsuit gutting pre-existing conditions

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Madison, WI–Today, Democratic nominee for governor Tony Evers announced that if elected, his first act in office would be to send a letter to the Attorney General withdrawing Wisconsin from the lawsuit Texas, et al v the United States, that would eliminate the Affordable Care Act and its protections for the 2.4 million Wisconsinites with pre-existing conditions.  This past February, Scott Walker authorized the Attorney General to add Wisconsin to the multi-state lawsuit, and he has refused to respond to Evers’ multiple challenges to drop the lawsuit and protect the health security of Wisconsin families. Evers’ letter would revoke this authorization.

“I know that the approximately 2.4 million Wisconsinites with a pre-existing condition share my deep concern that this litigation jeopardizes their access to quality and affordable health care,” the letter states. “I cannot continue to allow the use of taxpayer resources toward a lawsuit that could undermine the health security of the people of the state.”

Throughout his eight years as governor, Walker has offered empty promises to Wisconsinites on protecting people with pre-existing conditions. He has long championed repealing the Affordable Care Act, and last year he supported a repeal bill that would have gutted pre-existing condition protections, instituted an age tax on Wisconsin seniors, and kicked millions of people off their health care. Just last week, Politifact confirmed that Walker backs plans to end protections for pre-existing conditions. And this morning on the Jay Weber show, Walker doubled down on his decision to put Wisconsin on this harmful lawsuit.

The text of the letter Evers would send his first day in office is below:

January 7, 2019

Attorney General:

As my first act in office, I am immediately withdrawing the authority previously provided under Wis. Stat. § 165.25(1m) for Wisconsin to participate in litigation over the Affordable Care Act in Texas, et al .v. the United States.

I know that the approximately 2.4 million Wisconsinites with a pre-existing condition share my deep concern that this litigation jeopardizes their access to quality and affordable health care. If successful, it could once again allow insurance companies to deny coverage to people with pre-existing conditions—such as asthma, diabetes, or cancer—or allow them to charge exceedingly high rates.

I cannot continue to allow the use of taxpayer resources toward a lawsuit that could undermine the health security of the people of the state.

Sincerely,

Tony Evers

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