Vukmir campaign: Baldwin voted against ‘three strikes and you’re out’ for Wisconsin’s most dangerous criminals

Contact: Jessica Ward, (608) 213-5939

Brookfield, Wis. – Like gubernatorial candidate Tony Evers who wants to release violent criminals into Wisconsin communities, Sen. Tammy Baldwin supports soft-on-crime policies, proven by her vote against mandating life in prison for a two-time felon convicted of a third serious offense.

Baldwin’s vote mirrors her positions of voting against mandatory sentences for failing to register as a sex offender and lighter sentencing for child sex offenders.

“It’s clear Baldwin wants to let violent criminals free on our streets. She voted against life in prison for two-time felons convicted of a third violent offense, against harsh sentences for failing to register as a sex offender and for lighter punishments for child sex offenders,” said Leah Vukmir campaign manager Jess Ward. “As a pediatric nurse and military mom, Leah Vukmir will protect our communities and fight for tougher and consistent sentences for criminals convicted of heinous, violent crimes.”

BACKGROUND …

“An Assembly Committee Wednesday Endorsed 13-1 A Complicated Compromise Of The Politically Popular ‘Three Strikes And You’re Out’ Idea Intended To Imprison Three-Time Felons For Life.” (Capitol Report: ‘Three Strikes Compromise,’” The Wisconsin State Journal, 2/24/94)

Baldwin Said The Bill Focused More On Punishment Than Public Safety, And Called It “Cookbook Justice.” “Rep. Tammy Baldwin who heads a committee that oversees prisons, said the compromise still focused more on punishment than public safety. “It’s cookbook justice,” Baldwin said of the Bill’s sentencing rules.” (Capitol Report: ‘Three Strikes Compromise,’” The Wisconsin State Journal, 2/24/94)

In March 1994, The Wisconsin Assembly Passed Three-Strikes Legislation, Which Would Mean Life Imprisonment For Someone Who Has Two Convictions Already When Committing A Third Offense In Any Of The 10 Categories Of Crime.“Repeat offenders would risk life in prison without parole under anticrime bills approved by the legislature and forwarded to Gov. Tommy G. Thompson. In response to complaints that too many ex-convicts commit more crimes, a ‘three strikes and you’re out feature’ would mean life imprisonment for someone who has two convictions already when committing a third offense in any of the 10 categories of crime.” (“‘Three Strikes’ Bill Approved,” The Associated Press, 3/25/94)

(Capitol Report: ‘Three Strikes Compromise,’” The Wisconsin State Journal, 2/24/94)
In 2005, Baldwin voted for an amendment that would have eliminated the mandatory minimum sentences of five years in prison for failing to register as a sex offender. “Inglis, R-S.C., amendment that would eliminate the mandatory minimum sentences of five years in prison for failing to register as a sex offender or for making false statements during registration.” (H. Amdt. 527 To H.R. 3132, Roll Call Vote #468, Amendment Rejected: 106-316, 9/14/05, Baldwin Voted Yea; CQ Summary Accessed 4/20/17)

On November 5, 1997, Baldwin voted against the passage of Assembly Bill 505. (AB505Passed 75-22, 11/5/97, Baldwin Voted Nay)

AB 505 created a new category of persistent repeater under the three strikes law, and requires a person who is a persistent repeater based on convictions for serious child sex offenses to be sentenced to life without parole. “This bill creates a new category of persistent repeater. Specifically, the bill provides that a person is a persistent repeater if he or she has one or more prior convictions for a serious child sex offense and is subsequently convicted of committing another serious child sex offense. Like a person with 3 serious felony convictions under current law, a person who is a persistent repeater based on convictions for serious child sex offenses must be sentenced to life without parole. The serious child sex offenses covered by the bill are sexual assault of a child, sexual exploitation of a child, incest with a child, child enticement, soliciting a child for prostitution, sexual assault of a student by a school instructional staff person, causing a child to view or listen to sexual activity, exposing a child to harmful material and, if the victim was a minor and the convicted person was not the victim’s parent, false imprisonment and kidnapping.” (AB 505, Bill Text, Signed Into Law 7/1/98)

The bill provides for a sentence of life without parole for an offender who is convicted of a serious child sex offense and who has one prior serious child sex offense, and eliminates the current 5 year minimum penalty and 10-year penalty enhancer for repeat child sex offenders. “Because the bill provides for a sentence of life without parole for an offender who is convicted of a serious child sex offense and who has one prior serious child sex offense, the bill also eliminates the current 5 year minimum penalty and 10-year penalty enhancer for repeat child sex offenders.” (AB 505, Bill Text, Signed Into Law 7/1/98)

Democrat gubernatorial candidate Tony Evers thinks Wisconsin spends too much money on corrections and wants to release prisoners. “State Schools Superintendent Tony Evers said Wisconsin needs to follow the example of states like Texas that have cut parole revocations and expanded drug courts. He said he would consider releasing some inmates early; providing more drug treatment behind bars; treating 17-year-olds as juveniles instead of adults for criminal charges; and overhauling truth-in-sentencing so prisoners could be released for good behavior. ‘The fact that we as a state spend more on corrections than (the University of Wisconsin) System tells me the last thing we need is to build a brand-new prison,’ he said in an emailed statement. He said he opposes holding inmates in private prisons and supports closing the Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility ‘as soon as possible.’” (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, 07/05/18)

Last week, Tammy Baldwin sent out a fundraising email praising Tony Evers for being a “rock solid progressive” and a “champion for children.” (Scott Bauer’s Twitter, 8/21/18)

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