Walker campaign: In The News: Gov. Walker’s bold reforms have Wisconsin working

 

Contact: Austin Altenburg
media@scottwalker.com

[Madison, Wis.] – Under Gov. Walker’s leadership, Wisconsin has enacted conservative reform that continues to keep Wisconsin working.

Over the past few months, Gov. Walker’s ambitious agenda has continued to produce results for hard-working families. On top of nationally leading welfare reforms, record-low unemployment, bold reforms to fight the opioid crisis and historic investments in education – just to name a few – Gov. Walker continues to push for more bold reforms that will keep moving Wisconsin forward.

Check out what’s in the news:

From Wisconsin Public Radio: “Federal officials have approved Gov. Scott Walker’s request to establish new economic opportunity zones in 44 Wisconsin counties. … The governor asked to create 120 economic opportunity zones, a designation under the new federal tax law designed to spur development. The program creates a tax incentive for businesses and individuals that invest in the zones.”

From Daily Reporter: “The Public Service Commission of Wisconsin awarded $7.6 million on Thursday to bolster the state’s high-speed-internet offerings — laying the groundwork for what would be the largest round of broadband expansion grants in state history.”

From WKOW: “Governor Scott Walker signed a bill Thursday aimed at recruiting more young people for jobs in the construction industry. The measure allows high school seniors to sign apprenticeship contracts, as long as their school approves and the school meets state requirements.”

From Appleton Post-Crescent: “A state program that gives high school students hands-on experience in a variety of career fields is ‘more important than ever before,’ Gov. Scott Walker said during a visit on Friday to Kimberly High School. … The program has more than doubled in size during Walker’s tenure and now gets nearly $4 million in state funding and has spots for about 4,300 students. Kimberly High School currently has 30 students in apprenticeships in eight different career fields.”

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