Daily Archives: October 9, 2019

Fitzgerald calls Trump impeachment inquiry a ‘political witch hunt’

Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald says he believes the impeachment inquiry by House Dems into President Trump’s involvement in Ukraine is a “political witch hunt.”

The Juneau Republican, who last month launched a campaign to succeed retiring U.S. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner in the 5th CD, was asked by reporters about the impeachment push. The inquiry centers on the allegation that Trump pressured the newly elected president of Ukraine to do him a “favor” by investigating political rival Joe Biden and his family.

But Fitzgerald told reporters after a news conference Tuesday that he didn’t believe Trump had done anything wrong.

“It sounds like everything that was done within that discussion was in the purview of what a president of the United States should be able to do with any foreign diplomat, and it shouldn’t necessarily be made public,” he said.

Fitzgerald told reporters that there are “members of Congress now that are saying they still believe it’s kind of a political witch hunt and that they’re going after the president.” When asked if he believed the inquiry was a “witch hunt,” Fitzgerald replied, “I do.”

“I think it’s just another story that’s going to perpetuate itself probably between now and the end of the election that (Dems are) going to want to investigate,” he said.

The Juneau Republican also suggested Trump wasn’t serious in his public calls last week for China and Ukraine to investigate the Dem presidential frontrunner.

“I think a lot of people would take exception to anyone calling for a foreign government to investigate any political opponent, I get that,” Fitzgerald said. “I think what he was suggesting was something off the cuff that I don’t know that anyone would take it seriously.”

But while Fitzgerald said “everything should be vetted,” he also cast doubt on the legitimacy of the investigation.

“You can continue down the path of exploring all these different items, but whether or not they’re legit, there’s a whole different question or whether or not they’re politically motivated,” he said.

Neylon: Announces decision not to run for WI 5th Congressional District

0

Contact: [email protected]

In regard to running for Wisconsin’s 5th Congressional District seat in Congress, Rep. Adam Neylon (R-Pewaukee) issued the following statement:

“Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner’s retirement came as a surprise. Not only was he a mentor to me, but he’s been a rock solid, highly effective congressman. My first memories of politics involve Congressman Sensenbrenner. I worked for him for over three years, starting out as his driver and eventually moving to his office in Washington DC. Congressman Sensenbrenner taught me more about politics than school ever could. I’ve never experienced such an encyclopedia-like knowledge of politics, policy, religion and history.

“Someone else will be elected to the 5th Congressional District, but Jim will never be replaced. His legacy will live on, alongside all his accomplishments that made Wisconsin and the country a better place.

“It would be an honor to follow in his footsteps and represent the people of Wisconsin’s 5th Congressional District in the United States Congress. But the timing is not right for my family and I.

“After careful consideration, a lot of prayer and many discussions, I have decided not to run for Congress at this time. I am fully committed to re-election to the State Assembly and representing the people of the 98th Assembly District.

“To those reaching out I want to say thank you for your support and trust.”

One Wisconsin Now: Free speech crackdown on agenda for University of Wisconsin Board of Regents meeting

0

MADISON, Wis. — The University of Wisconsin Board of Regents is poised to push forward with a controversial plan to limit campus speech that, according to One Wisconsin Institute Executive Director Analiese Eicher, appears targeted at appeasing right-wing politicians instead of protecting the rights of students, faculty and staff. With mere days’ notice, the measure to modify the University of Wisconsin administrative code was included on the agenda of the Board of Regents meeting to be held on the UW-Superior campus.

“The Board of Regents seems to be more interested in pandering to right-wing politicians than protecting free speech,” said Eicher. “Their proposal would put into state administrative rules a punitive crackdown on students speaking out while protecting hate speech on campuses.”

Under the proposed rule, students would be subjected to investigation if they are accused of “disrupting the free speech rights of others,” broadly defined as “violent or other disorderly misconduct that materially and substantially disrupted the free expression of others.” The rule further subjects students to mandatory penalties for violations, including suspension for at least one semester for two violations and expulsion for a third.

A hearing on the proposal was convened by the Regents in mid-August, in the midst of moving week for off-campus area housing in Madison and weeks before classes begin and students moved into campus housing. According to media reports, no members of the Board of Regents actually attended the hearing, at which all comments submitted by the public were in opposition to the effort to restrict campus speech.

Eicher noted the punitive measures proposed by the Regents’ rule are unnecessary given the lack of incidents involving disruptions of speech and the existing ability under state law and university policies to deal with serious incidents of misconduct or threatening behavior.

Meanwhile, with white nationalism is on the rise, and disturbing incidents of harassment based on race and sexual orientation occurring on several University of Wisconsin campuses, the proposed changes to UWS 17 could make the situation worse. Deference and protection to provocateurs and their hateful speech would be enshrined in state administrative rules while targeting students, faculty and staff who believe everyone ought to be treated with respect and free from harassment on campus.

Campus speech restrictions gained prominence in Wisconsin in 2017, when Assembly Speaker Robin Vos personally oversaw the development of legislation to impose them on UW campuses. While Vos’ initial effort to adopt legislation faltered, the Board of Regents has pursued much of what the Speaker sought as UW System policy. President John Behling, an appointee of former Gov. Scott Walker, was not subtle in saying their action showed “… a responsiveness to what’s going on in the Capitol, which helps build relationships.”

Vos and a handful of legislators have recently re-introduced legislation largely similar to the 2017 version, including language threatening students with suspension and expulsion for violations. However, the latest proposal adds new language that could allow a white nationalist alleging their “expressive rights are violated by a violation of the bill’s requirements to bring an action to enjoin a violation and obtain reasonable attorneys fees and damages.”

Proposed Assembly rule changes would allow Anderson to phone into hearings, permit multiple veto override attempts

Dem Rep. Jimmy Anderson, who is paralyzed from the waist down, would be allowed to phone into committee hearings to accommodate his disability under a package of rule changes GOP Assembly leaders proposed Tuesday.

But Dems said the changes — which include a provision that would allow the Assembly to make multiple runs at overriding a guv veto — was an attempt by the GOP to “jam in a whole kitchen sink of partisan political objectives.” Now, the Assembly is only allowed one vote on a veto.

“You’re going far beyond the scope of (the accommodation) and turning what should be something we all agree on unanimously into very partisan process and using a member with a disability as an excuse to do that,” said Rep. Mark Spreitzer, D-Beloit, during the Rules Committee meeting. “I think that’s disgusting.”

Majority Leader Jim Steineke, R-Kaukauna, told committee members that GOP leaders were looking at rule changes and “that was part of it.”

The chamber has yet to approve a new rule package for the 2019-20 session.

“One of the things that we found out when we were going through looking at the ability to do a veto override was that if we tried a veto override and it failed and circumstances on the ground changed over the course of the coming weeks or months, we could not revisit that,” he said. “We did not think that was right.”

A spokeswoman for Gov. Tony Evers accused Vos of using turning Anderson’s request “into an opportunity for political retribution.”

“It’s time for Vos to get over last November’s election and start working on the issues facing our state,” spokeswoman Britt Cudaback said in a tweet.

Anderson said he has been pushing for rule changes since the beginning of the legislative session in January. He claimed his disability, combined with Assembly rules barring him from phoning into Assembly hearings, prevents him from properly representing his constituents. He also called for an end to overnight floor sessions except in case of emergencies and requested all committee hearings and non-emergency floor sessions be held during “reasonable hours.”

But he was rebuffed by Vos in August. The Rochester Republican told Anderson at the time he can’t change chamber rules via “fiat” and accused the Fitchburg Dem of “political grandstanding.” Vos has long opposed allowing lawmakers to call into meetings, noting on several occasions that he finds it offensive to witnesses who make their way to the Capitol to testify.

Anderson then reached out to Disability Rights Wisconsin for legal representation, and the organization in September sent Vos a letter reiterating Anderson’s request and warning they will “be forced to pursue legal action” if “you continue to continue to reject these reasonable requests.

But in a news conference this afternoon, Vos, Steineke, and Rep. Tyler August, R-Lake Geneva, unveiled a package of rules that would allow members with a “permanent disability” certified by the chamber’s Americans with Disabilities Act coordinator to call into meetings.

Vos said despite the mudslinging between him and Anderson over the summer, Republican leadership “looked at the situation and tried to take politics out of it.”

“I think we took the politics out of it, just took a step back and all figured out the best way to make sure that Rep. Anderson can represent his district, but also do it in a way that doesn’t really compromise the integrity of what we think the Legislature should be,” Vos said.

But while speaking with reporters after the Rules meeting, Anderson blasted the rules package. The Fitchburg Dem said if Republicans were serious about making accommodations for him, they would have drafted the accommodation separately from the veto override measure and consulted with him.

“Excluding me from the process I think is, again, offensive, disappointing and frankly really frustrating,” he said.

He warned the proposed changes to the veto override process “encourages them to take advantage of individuals like myself.”

“Knowing that I may not be able to be there for an entire session allows them to take advantage of that and maybe do a veto override in violation of what I would think would be the will of the people,” he said.

Republicans currently hold a 63-36 advantage in the Assembly and need two-thirds of members in attendance during floor sessions to override a gubernatorial veto.

— Other proposed rule changes include:

*Establishing time limits for debate on each proposal scheduled for a floor vote. The proposal calls for negotiations between the majority and minority leaders on time limits, but notes if no agreement is reached, the majority-controlled Rules Committee establishes time limits for each proposal.

*Adding partisan caucuses to the list of motions and procedures the presiding officer can deem out of order if “being used for the purpose of delay.”

*Allowing the presiding officer to order a call of the Assembly to require absent members to return to the chamber without needing seconds. Under current rules, such a request requires 15 members to second the call.

*Moving resolution to the last order of business for the chamber to take up during a floor session.

*Changes to the process of withdrawing proposals from committee.

*A modification of a rule that would allow a majority of members to vote to return a proposal to the second reading stage.

*Changing the timeline for referral of proposal to the calendar.

*Excluding the offices of the majority leader from the definition of the Assembly Chamber.

See the Anderson letter:
https://www.wispolitics.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Anderson.Attorney.Letter.pdf

See the proposed rule changes:
https://www.wispolitics.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/10081902.pdf

See Cudaback’s tweet:
https://twitter.com/BrittCudaback/status/1181656304143753216

Protect Our Care Wisconsin: Will Sen. Johnson stand up for Wisconsinites with pre-existing conditions?

0

MILWAUKEE, WI – Senate Democrats filed a discharge petition to force a vote on the Protect Pre-Existing Conditions Act, which would undo the Trump administration’s new junk insurance plans that don’t cover people with pre-existing conditions. In response, Protect Our Care Wisconsin state director Joe Zepecki issued the following statement:

“Any senator who votes against this resolution sends a clear message: they don’t support protections for people with pre-existing conditions. Voters made clear they want these protections, but Senate Republicans and President Trump continue to sabotage our health care and let insurance companies discriminate against the millions of Americans with pre-existing conditions, including 2,420,100 Wisconsinites. Trump and Republicans have pushed to let the insurance companies sell these junk plans, which cost more and cover less. If Senator Johnson votes against this resolution, it will be a nightmare for Wisconsin families and will come back to haunt him politically.”

 

The following organizations support the resolution: National Multiple Sclerosis Society, American Heart Association, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Pulmonary Hypertension Association, Mended Little Hearts, Hemophilia Federation of America, Chronic Disease Coalition, American Diabetes Association, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, National Organization for Rare Disorders, WomenHeart: the National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, Susan G. Komen, Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation, COPD Foundation, Muscular Dystrophy Association, National Hemophilia Foundation, the Arthritis Foundation, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, National Psoriasis Foundation, Alpha-1 Foundation, ALS Association, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Immune Deficiency Foundation, March of Dimes, American Liver Foundation, National Health Council, National Patient Advocate Foundation, Protect Our Care, and the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship.

 

BACKGROUND

President Trump Wants To Gut Crucial Guardrail Protections. If He Gets His Way:

  • Protections for people with pre-existing conditions would be essentially meaningless. The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network said allowing states to waive essential health benefits “could render those protections meaningless” for people with pre-existing conditions.

  • It would be harder for people with pre-existing conditions to get affordable coverage. As Consumers Union stated, allowing states to waive essential health benefits would be “putting meaningful coverage out of reach for many Americans, especially those with chronic and pre existing conditions.”

  • You could pay more for the same coverage. The Trump administration would allow states to adjust the amount of premium tax credits and cost sharing consumers receive to help lower their costs. Without the guardrail to ensure coverage is just as affordable, many consumers could end up paying more for the same care.

  • Insurers would not have to cover essential benefits, like maternity care. Right now, every insurance plan must cover the 10 essential health benefits. Because states could opt out of covering these basic benefits, insurers would likely only offer policies that covered much less than they do now. The Kaiser Family Foundation found that the benefits most likely to no longer be covered would be maternity care, mental health or substance abuse coverage.

  • Insurers could reimpose lifetime and annual limits. Allowing states to opt out of the essential health benefits coverage means that insurance companies could once again put lifetime and annual limits on the amount of care you receive. The Center for American Progress estimates that 20 million people with health coverage through their employer would face lifetime limits on coverage, and 27 million would face annual limits.

As Many As 130 Million Americans Have A Pre-Existing Condition

  • According to an analysis by the Center for American Progress, roughly half of nonelderly Americans, or as many as 130 million people, have a pre-existing condition. This includes:

    • 44 million people who have high blood pressure

    • 45 million people who have behavioral health disorders

    • 44 million people who have high cholesterol

    • 34 million people who have asthma and chronic lung disease

    • 34 million people who have osteoarthritis and other joint disorders

  • 17 million children, 68 million women, and 30 million people aged 55-64 have a pre-existing condition

Rep. Allen: Announces First Responder of the Year for 97th Assembly District

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

Rep. Ballweg: Three Bills Advance

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

Rep. Dittrich: Honoring Sergeant Scott Wheeler as First Responder of the Year

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

Rep. Hintz: Statement on latest Republican power grab

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

Rep. Myers: Issues a statement regarding the passage of AB 195

0

MADISON – Today, the Wisconsin Senate passed AB 195 which modifies the license to teach based on reciprocity.  This legislation changes a license to teach based on reciprocity from an initial license to a provisional license.  This change allows the Department of Public Instruction to issue a lifetime license to a classroom teacher that was educated out of state and successfully completes six semesters (three school years) of teaching in a Wisconsin school.

 

During the 2018-2019 school year, the Department of Public Instruction issued 409 teacher licenses based on reciprocity.  This number is derived from the 2017-2019 state budget, which removed the requirement for a teacher to receive an offer of employment to teach in a school located in the state in order to qualify for an educator license based on licensure in another state.

 

“Today, Wisconsin took a step in the right direction” Rep. Myers stated.  She went on to lament, “As an educator that earned my license outside of Wisconsin, I personally understand the struggle to obtain a teaching license in this state.  I also know the fleeting feeling of having to renew a license every five years, understanding that no matter how great an educator I proved I was, I would never have the ability to earn a lifetime license like my colleagues.  The senate’s passage of AB 195 today creates parity amongst certified teachers and will prove to be beneficial in attracting and retaining professional educators to Wisconsin’s classrooms.”

 

AB 195 has now passed both houses of the legislature and is headed to Governor Evers’ desk to be signed into law.

Rep. Nygren: Statement on retirement announcement of Rep. Mike Rohrkaste

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

Sen. Cowles: Honoring Electa Quinney’s place in Wisconsin history

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

Sen. Cowles: Senate unanimously supports ‘Biting Back’ against lyme disease

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

Sen. Darling: Senate unanimously approves Darling bills protecting vulnerable citizens

0
Madison – The Wisconsin State Senate is giving unanimous support to four bills authored by State Senator Alberta Darling which will help protect vulnerable citizens of our state. The bills will help protect victims of sexual assault, stop sex trafficking, protect homeless teens, and stop the diabetes epidemic in our state. Senator Darling says she is grateful the bills received overwhelming support.

“I’m proud to author these important bills which help protect the vulnerable in Wisconsin,” Darling said, “They will help make our state safer and healthier.”

Assembly Bill 52 will allow 17-year-olds from broken homes or living on the streets to find shelter and a safe place to sleep. According to the National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse, one out of every three homeless teens is recruited for sex trafficking within 48 hours of leaving home. Having a safe place to sleep will greatly increase the chances of that student finishing high school and may help protect them from sex trafficking.

Assembly Bill 22 will help train truck drivers in identifying sex trafficking. All 72 counties in Wisconsin have reported incidents of human trafficking. Senator Darling is a co-author of a bill authored by State Senator LaTonya Johnson of Milwaukee that will help train truck drivers to recognize and report the signs of human trafficking.

Senate Bill 332 creates the Wisconsin Sexual Assault Kit Tracking System. The system will allow victims of sexual assault to track the location and status of their rape kit. Victims have the right to know if and when their kit is being processed or stored and isn’t lost or backlogged. Senator Darling is also a co-author of Senate Bill 200 which helps prevent a future backlog of sexual assault kits.

Senate Bill 217 requires the Department of Health Services and the Employee Trust Fund to create a Diabetes Action Plan for Wisconsin. The plan will recommend ways to reduce the impact of diabetes in the state.

Assembly Bills 22 and 52 now head to Governor Evers’ desk. Senate Bills 217 and 332 will go to the State Assembly for further action.

Senator Darling represents portions of Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Washington and Waukesha Counties.

Sen. Erpenbach: Senate unanimously passes Verona TID bill

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

Sen. Marklein: Bills passed by the Senate

0

Madison, WI – Senator Howard Marklein (R-Spring Green) announced that the State Senate passed four of his bills and two important joint resolutions during floor session today.

“I appreciate the support from my colleagues for the important initiatives we passed today,” Marklein said. “It is an honor to work on legislation that was developed by residents of the 17th Senate District. The best legislation comes from those who are living and working in our communities every day.”

“The idea for Assembly Bill (AB) 195 was brought to me by school district leaders in my Senate district,” Marklein said. “Teachers from many rural communities along our border, may go to college out of state, but want to return home to teach after they graduate. As I have talked with the superintendents in my districts, I have learned that there is a shortage of qualified applicants and we should not be discouraging otherwise qualified teaching candidates, because of where they completed their teaching credentials. I am optimistic that Governor Evers will sign this bi-partisan legislation to support our rural schools.”

“We also took time today to recognize the life and service of my friend, the late Representative Ed Brooks,” Marklein said. “I miss Ed very much and this resolution is just one way to honor his service to our community and the state of Wisconsin.”

“Finally, I am proud to be a co-author of the joint resolution to recognize and support the 115th Fighter Wing and our work to base F-35As at Truax Field National Guard Base,” Marklein said. “Getting the F-35 installation in Wisconsin will have significant impact of the 17th Senate District, especially Volk Field in Camp Douglas. Our recognition today is just one more way we can demonstrate the state’s support for the F-35s and the 115th Fighter Wing and hopefully win the approval of the National Guard.”

A summary of each bill passed today follows:

Senate Bill (SB) 304 – Auto Dealer Warranty Work – This bill protects the automobile dealers in our communities when they perform work for warranty repairs on behalf of a manufacturer. Several local auto dealers in the 17th Senate District requested this legislation.

SB 351 – Temporary Storage Rule – Many construction contractors, especially those near the state line, have building materials shipped to their home location, stored temporarily, and then transported across the state line for use in a construction project in another state. Unfortunately, due to Wisconsin’s current tax structure, these temporarily stored materials are assessed Wisconsin sales and use tax. This taxation puts Wisconsin companies at no less than a 5% disadvantage when bidding for projects in tax-free areas in other states compared to companies located in the same state as the project.

This bill will allow construction companies to receive a Wisconsin sales and use tax exemption for tangible personal property that is first shipped to Wisconsin, stored in Wisconsin for less than 120 days, and then used in the fulfillment of real property construction in a tax-free area in another state, such as non-profits, school districts, or Enterprise Zones.  It was initiated by local companies, like Precision Drive Controls (PDC) in Monroe, WI.

SB 362 – Delete 19 Pages of Obsolete Statutes – The 2013-2015 state budget sunset seven refundable tax credits, but the statutory language was kept on the books. This language should be deleted because taxpayers cannot file for these credits anymore. This bill helps clean-up the statutes.

AB 195 – Out-of-state Teacher Licensing Reciprocity – This bill creates a reasonable pathway for teachers who are licensed out-of-state to receive a teaching license to teach in Wisconsin.

Senate Joint Resolution (SJR) 62 – Honoring the Life & Service of Representative Ed Brooks

SJR 69 – Recognizing the contributions of the 115th Fighter Wing and showing support for basing F-35As at Truax Field National Guard Base in Wisconsin.

Sen. Stroebel: Bill designating 9/11 memorial highway unanimously passes state senate

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

Sen. Testin: Hemp bill passes Senate

0

Madison, WI – Those participating in Wisconsin’s burgeoning hemp industry scored a win on Tuesday with the passage of the Growing Opportunities Act through the State Senate.

The bill, authored by Senators Patrick Testin (R-Stevens Point) and Lena Taylor (D-Milwaukee) and Representatives Tony Kurtz (R-Wonewoc) and Dave Considine (D-Baraboo), would transition Wisconsin’s hemp pilot program into a permanent one – a move made possible by the passage of the 2018 federal farm bill last December.

“Hemp is Wisconsin’s comeback crop,” said Sen. Testin. “This bill works to build confidence at every level of the hemp industry. Farmers, processors, retailers, and customers need to have a reasonable regulatory framework that ensures maximum opportunity and safety.”

In 2019, over 1,400 farmers applied for grower’s licenses from the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (DATCP) – up from 250 in year one. The number of hemp processor applications also grew exponentially – from around 100 to nearly 700. Rep. Kurtz, a certified organic farmer, holds one of the growing licenses and planted hemp for the first time this year.

“Hemp gives farmers the opportunity to diversify,” said Rep. Kurtz. “That’s especially important when commodity prices are low. I believe that with the right framework, Wisconsin can and will be a national leader in hemp production. That’s something we can all support.”

Rep. Dave Considine, a former livestock farmer, agreed that now is the time to make Wisconsin’s hemp program permanent.

“The Growing Opportunities Act will ensure that Wisconsin’s hemp program continues to be managed right here in Wisconsin,” said Rep. Considine. “That’s important to me, and I know it’s important to the hundreds of farmers across the state who are investing their time, money, and effort in this crop.”

Sen. Lena Taylor, a Milwaukee Democrat, points out that hemp is providing opportunities for people in every corner of the state.

“Hemp is providing opportunities for rural and urban entrepreneurs alike, and many of my constituents are emerging as leaders in this industry,” said Senator Taylor. “Americans already consume millions of imported hemp products-that’s money that can and should be spent here in our state of Wisconsin, and my city of Milwaukee.”

Now that the Growing Opportunities Act has passed the Senate, it must now pass the Assembly, where it had a hearing earlier this month.

Sen. Wanggaard: Health insurance for fallen officer’s families clears Senate

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

State Senate Democratic Committee: Applauds senators for prioritizing Wisconsinites over politics

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

U.S. Rep. Grothman: Offices open on Columbus Day

0

(Washington, D.C.) – Congressman Glenn Grothman (R-Glenbeulah) today announced that his offices will be open on Columbus Day, October 14, 2019.

Staff in both the Washington, D.C. and Fond du Lac offices will be here to serve constituents of the Sixth District on Monday.

If you would like to contact Congressman Grothman’s office, please call 202-225-2476 (Washington, D.C.) or 920-907-0624 (Fond du Lac), or visit grothman.house.gov.

“When I was a lawyer in the private sector, it was always frustrating that the government would be off for federal holidays while I was working,” said Grothman“Now that I work in government, I want my office and staff to be available to the hundreds of thousands of residents in the Sixth District.

WED AM Update: Kaul urges lawmakers to take action on red-flag legislation

This content is for subscribers only. Subscribe now to get access to this and other members-only content.
Subscribe Now or Login

Or purchase access to just this article:
Single-Article Access

WED News Summary: Evers signs Indigenous Peoples’ Day executive order; Senate floor session coverage

This content is for subscribers only. Subscribe now to get access to this and other members-only content.
Subscribe Now or Login

Or purchase access to just this article:
Single-Article Access

WED PM Update: Pollsters say health care, economy top issues for 2020

This content is for subscribers only. Subscribe now to get access to this and other members-only content.
Subscribe Now or Login

Or purchase access to just this article:
Single-Article Access

Wisconsin Department of Transportation: Response to October 7 letter

0

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

WisDems: Congresswoman Gwen Moore Hosts Round Table with Constituents, Community Advocates, About High Prescription Drug Costs

Note: If this post has anything to do with Evers, the Evers administration or lame-duck legislation and related lawsuits, please tag it as Evers Administration. Please delete this note before publishing.

WisPolitics Midday – October 9, 2019

0

In today’s WisPolitics Midday update, brought to you by Spectrum:

  • GOP proposes a rule change that would allow a paralyzed Dem rep to phone into committee hearings.
  • WI Sen backs 5 Evers cabinet picks.
  • AG Josh Kaul predicts Gov Evers will call a special session on gun control soon.

October 10, 2019 | October 8, 2019
- Advertisement -