Gov. Evers: Encourages Wisconsinites to take preventative steps ahead of expected dangerous heatwave

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MADISON — Gov. Tony Evers today is encouraging people to remain vigilant and take steps to prevent heat-related illnesses with dangerous heat expected for Wisconsin through the weekend.

“When temperatures rise to dangerous levels, it’s important to make sure you and your family are doing everything possible to beat the heat,” Gov. Evers said. “Hot weather is especially dangerous for older adults, infants and young children, and those suffering from chronic health problems such as asthma and heart disease.”

The National Weather Service has issued an Excessive Heat Watch for portions of southwestern Wisconsin. Heat indices ranging from the upper 90s to over 100 across all of southern Wisconsin are possible by Friday. Combined with dewpoints in the low to mid-70s, this could create a hazardous situation that may linger into Saturday.

“Be sure to check on elderly neighbors and family members regularly, to make sure they are safe,” said Wisconsin Emergency Management Administrator Dr. Darrell L. Williams. “Isolated individuals who may not know how to cool off, may not have air conditioning, or who are hesitant to ask for help are especially vulnerable.”

The public is urged to consider taking the following steps during the upcoming heatwave to help protect themselves and others:

  • Drink plenty of water – Do not wait until you are thirsty to start drinking. Take regular breaks to hydrate, especially if you are spending time outdoors.
  • Find a cool place – Seek air-conditioned homes or public spaces. Check with local community resources, which may open cooling centers. Avoid spending time outdoors during the hottest parts of the day.
  • Watch for signs of heat-related illness – If you start feeling dizzy, nauseous, weak, and are sweating excessively, you may be suffering from heat exhaustion. Get to a cool place and drink water. If your body temperatures spikes, you lose consciousness or experience a throbbing headache, you may be suffering heatstroke and should seek immediate medical attention!
  • Check on elderly or disabled neighbors – Friends and family who have mobility issues or other impairments may not notice temperatures rising. Make sure they have access to the resources they need to remain safe.
  • Don’t leave people, especially children, and pets in cars – The temperature inside a parked, closed car can climb 20 degrees in just 10 minutes, leading to life-threatening conditions. Never leave people or pets in vehicles, even for just a few minutes!
  • Protect pets and livestock – Hot weather can also put the lives of animals at risk. Make sure they have access to plenty of water and shaded areas to get out of the sun. Consider bringing pets inside a cool basement.

To find more tips for staying safe from the heat visit ReadyWisconsin (https://readywisconsin.wi.gov/be-informed/extreme-heat/), the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/climate/heat.htm), and the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (https://datcp.wi.gov/Pages/Programs_Services/PetsWeather.aspx).

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