Rep. Steineke: Born Alive Abortion Survivors Act approved by Assembly

CONTACT: Rep. Jim Steineke                                                                             

(608) 266-2418

MADISON – The Born Alive Abortion Survivors Act, Assembly Bill 179, received support in the Assembly today as it passed on a 62-35 vote. Assembly Majority Leader Jim Steineke (R-Kaukauna) and Senate President Roger Roth (R-Appleton) authored the bill, which ensures infants born alive after surviving an abortion receive comprehensive care.

“This legislation is so crucial because it provides life-saving clarifications to health professionals on how to act towards abortion survivors,” said Rep. Steineke. “Whether you’re for or against abortion, everyone should be invested in making sure every single baby born gets a fighting chance at life.”

Assembly Bill 179 directs health care providers to exercise the same degree of professional skill, care, and diligence to preserve a born alive abortion survivor’s life, requires health care providers to report to a law enforcement agency if they have knowledge of non-compliance towards born alive children, allows women to bring claims for damages in these instances, and ensures the Department of Justice can enforce the provisions. Currently, there are no state laws to address these issues.

The legislation received overwhelming support during its public hearings, with more than twice as many people showing up in favor of the bill than opposed to it. Despite the strong public support for the bill, Governor Evers has said that he will not sign it because he doesn’t see it as a “productive use of time.” No Democrats in the Assembly voted for the bill.

“I’m disturbed and disappointed that my Democratic colleagues in the Assembly have followed Governor Evers’ lead in denying born alive abortion survivors the compassion and decency of ensuring they have proper care,” continued Rep. Steineke. “I will continue to stand up for the rights of babies and look forward to delivering the bill to Governor Evers’ desk.”

The bill now heads to the Senate for approval before being delivered to Governor Evers.

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