Conservation practice benefits environment and bottom line A recent episode of the Dairy Stream podcast featured an in-depth discussion about cover crops and their benefits to soil health, water quality and farm finances. Dairy Stream host Mike Austin talks with Jim Isermann, Illinois and Wisconsin field manager of the Soil Health Partnership, and Ken Rosenow, owner of Cedar Home Farms in Oconomowoc, Wis., talk about the expanding use of the conservation practice, the challenges and benefits, recommendations for beginners and financial support. The Nature Conservancy sponsored this episode. Listen here. Podcast breakdown:
  •      1:30: Soil Health Partnership’s role is supporting farmers (Isermann answer)
  •      2:40: Cedar Home Farms has been planting cover crops for six years (Rosenow)
  •      3:43: Cover crops reduce soil erosion and retain nutrients in the soil (Isermann)
  •      5:16: Cedar Home Farms plant cover crops to protect local waters (Rosenow)
  •      6:28: Cereal rye is the most popular cover crop, beginner recommendations (Isermann)
  •      9:38: Harvest crop can determine which cover crop to plant (Rosenow)
  •      11:27: Keep it simple when planting (Isermann)
  •      13:55: Seed and application costs can vary with soil types (Isermann)
  •      16:53: Flexibility is needed because of weather and seed cost changes (Rosenow)
  •      18:00: A common mistake is seeding at the wrong time (Isermann)
  •      19:44: Formulate a plan to ensure cover crops get planted (Rosenow)
  •      21:43: Farms must manage soil type and crop species (Isermann)
  •      23:21: Financial support is available for farms (Isermann)
  •      25:05: Planting can be done in numerous ways (Isermann)
  •      26:43: Improvising and using available equipment must be considered (Rosenow)
  •      28:21: Advice for a farmer wanting to get started (Rosenow)
  •      29:00: Start small, but get started (Isermann)
A recent episode of the Dairy Stream podcast featured an in-depth discussion about cover crops and their benefits to soil health, water quality and farm finances. Dairy Stream host Mike Austin talks with Jim Isermann, Illinois and Wisconsin field manager of the Soil Health Partnership, and Ken Rosenow, owner of Cedar Home Farms in Oconomowoc, Wis., talk about the expanding use of the conservation practice, the challenges and benefits, recommendations for beginners and financial support. The Nature Conservancy sponsored this episode. Listen here. Podcast breakdown:
  •      1:30: Soil Health Partnership’s role is supporting farmers (Isermann answer)
  •      2:40: Cedar Home Farms has been planting cover crops for six years (Rosenow)
  •      3:43: Cover crops reduce soil erosion and retain nutrients in the soil (Isermann)
  •      5:16: Cedar Home Farms plant cover crops to protect local waters (Rosenow)
  •      6:28: Cereal rye is the most popular cover crop, beginner recommendations (Isermann)
  •      9:38: Harvest crop can determine which cover crop to plant (Rosenow)
  •      11:27: Keep it simple when planting (Isermann)
  •      13:55: Seed and application costs can vary with soil types (Isermann)
  •      16:53: Flexibility is needed because of weather and seed cost changes (Rosenow)
  •      18:00: A common mistake is seeding at the wrong time (Isermann)
  •      19:44: Formulate a plan to ensure cover crops get planted (Rosenow)
  •      21:43: Farms must manage soil type and crop species (Isermann)
  •      23:21: Financial support is available for farms (Isermann)
  •      25:05: Planting can be done in numerous ways (Isermann)
  •      26:43: Improvising and using available equipment must be considered (Rosenow)
  •      28:21: Advice for a farmer wanting to get started (Rosenow)
  •      29:00: Start small, but get started (Isermann)
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