Johnson Still Refuses To Say Why He paid Next to Nothing in State Income Taxes Despite Making a Minimum Salary of Nearly Half a Million Dollars

Madison, Wis. — Fallout continues for Ron Johnson following a bombshell report from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel revealing that Johnson only paid $2,105 in state income taxes in 2017 despite making at least $450,000 that year. By comparison, a Wisconsin couple making $40,000 would pay $2,107 in state income taxes. Check out coverage about Johnson’s latest tax scandal below:

 

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Bice: Multimillionaire U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson paid a mere $2,105 in state income taxes in 2017, despite making big bucks

“For context, a married Wisconsin couple who jointly reported a taxable income of $40,000 — that is, their adjusted gross income minus all deductions and credits — would have had a 2017 state income tax bill of $2,107, two dollars more than what Johnson paid…That means he [Johnson] had a minimum income of $450,000 in the same year that he paid $2,105 in state income taxes.”

 

AP: Sen. Ron Johnson paid little in income taxes in 2017

“Johnson’s campaign provided few details and refused to release his federal income tax returns. ‘The senator had a smaller tax payment because he had less income to report in 2017,’ Johnson’s spokeswoman, Vanessa Ambrosini, told the newspaper. She declined to comment further about the matter to The Associated Press.”

 

WKBT – La Crosse

 

WZAW — Wausau

 

WQOW — Eau Claire


WTMJ — Milwaukee

 

WMSN — Madison

 

The Hill Reporter: The Curious Case of Ron Johnson’s Taxes

“Johnson ‘reported personal income ranging from $276,412 to $2.2 million in 2017 — on top of his Senate salary. That means he had a minimum income of $450,000 in the same year that he paid $2,105 in state income taxes,’ wrote Bice, adding that the mysterious 2017 underpayment has yet to be held to account.”

 

Salon: Sen. Ron Johnson, worth millions, paid almost nothing in 2017 state income tax–and won’t explain why

“It isn’t the first time Johnson has been under scrutiny over tax issues. In August, ProPublica reported that the Wisconsin legislator threatened to vote against Donald Trump’s 2017 tax overhaul if the bill didn’t include a provision to ‘sweeten the tax break for a class of companies…known as pass-throughs’ — a classification that allows those companies ‘to effectively skirt corporate income tax by letting profits directly pass through to owners, who then pay income tax on the gains,’ ProPublica explained. Two of Johnsons’ major donors ended up being major beneficiaries of the tax break, which Johnson’s pressure secured. He then in turn voted yes on Trump’s tax plan.”

 

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