Ultra-Rich Should Pay to Save Social Security, Swing-State Voter Poll Shows

The poll shows:

  • Trump leads Biden 49% to 43% across the seven swing states being polled by Bloomberg News and Morning Consult.
  • A majority of swing-state voters see worsening economic conditions in the coming months. 
  • An overwhelming 77% of registered voters in the seven states that will decide the 2024 presidential election like the idea of a billionaires tax to bolster Social Security shortfalls.

(WASHINGTON, D.C.) April 24, 2024 – President Joe Biden’s recent polling bump in key battleground states has mostly evaporated as a deep current of pessimism about the trajectory of the US economy hurts his standing with voters, according to a Bloomberg News/Morning Consult poll.

Read Bloomberg News’ coverage: 

**Biden’s Gains Against Trump Vanish on Deep Economic Pessimism, Poll Shows

**Ultra-Rich Should Pay to Save Social Security, Swing-State Voter Poll Shows

Read poll results, including methodology, HERE.

The April Bloomberg News/Morning Consult poll found Biden is ahead in just one of the seven states most likely to determine the outcome of his matchup with Donald Trump, leading Michigan by two percentage points. Biden trails the presumptive GOP nominee slightly in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, and his deficit in Georgia, Arizona, Nevada and North Carolina is larger.

Key Takeaways:

The Economy:

  • A majority of swing-state voters see worsening economic conditions in the coming months, with fewer than one in five saying they expect inflation and borrowing costs to be lower by the end of the year. 
  • Despite a resilient job market, only 23% of respondents said the employment rate would improve over the same time period.
  • More than three quarters of poll respondents say the president is responsible for the current performance of the US economy, and nearly half said he was “very responsible.”

Abortion:

  • More than half of swing-state voters said abortion was very important to their vote. 
  • In Arizona, abortion is now the most important issue for three in 10 Democratic women, surpassing the economy.
  • Independent voters in Arizona say they trust Biden over Trump on that issue by 12 percentage points. Among suburban women in that state, it’s a 25-point advantage.

Social Security:

  • An overwhelming 77% of registered voters in the seven states that will decide the 2024 presidential election like the idea of a billionaires tax to bolster Social Security shortfalls.
  • More than half say they approve of trimming benefits for high-earners, and for taxing wages for Social Security beyond the first $168,600 in earnings as done under current policy.
  • Across-the-board changes — raising the retirement age to 69 from 67 or introducing a new formula that results in less generous benefit payments — were less popular. Around one-fourth of poll respondents supported those policies, while about a third support increasing payroll taxes.
  • The poll also found that swing-state voters trust Biden more than Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump to preserve Social Security and Medicare, with 45% trusting Biden and 39% trusting Trump.

Bloomberg News and Morning Consult have tracked key election issues and patterns across seven swing states: Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Bloomberg News and Morning Consult will poll these seven swing states on a monthly basis through November 2024.

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Contacts: Bloomberg News Communications

Jessica Sarhan: jsarhan@bloomberg.net, Courtney Boland: cboland17@bloomberg.net.

Methodology: 

The Bloomberg News/Morning Consult poll surveyed 4,969 registered voters in seven swing states: 801 registered voters in Arizona, 802 in Georgia, 708 in Michigan, 450 in Nevada, 703 in North Carolina, 803 in Pennsylvania and 702 in Wisconsin. The surveys were conducted online from April 8-15. The aggregated data across the seven swing states were weighted to approximate a target sample of swing-state registered voters based on gender, age, race/ethnicity, marital status, home ownership, 2020 presidential vote and state. State-level data were weighted to approximate a target sample of registered voters in the respective state based on gender, age, race/ethnicity, marital status, home ownership, and 2020 presidential vote. The margin of error is plus or minus 1 percentage point across the seven states; 3 percentage points in Arizona, Georgia and Pennsylvania; 4 percentage points in Michigan, North Carolina, and Wisconsin, and 5 percentage points in Nevada.

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